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An Anglo-Saxon island has been uncovered in a field in Lincolnshire.The settlement at Little Carlton near Louth was discovered after local metal detectorist Graham Vickers found a silver writing tool.University of Sheffield archaeologists have since unearthed 300 dress pins and a large number of Sceatta coins.The island was once home to a Middle Saxon settlement and dates back to the 7th century.www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-35707690 ... See MoreSee Less
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On This Day in UK History.. 4th March..March fourth ( i.e. March forth!) is the only date in the calendar year that constitutes a sentence.1681 King Charles II granted a Royal Charter to William Penn, entitling him to establish a colony in North America called Pennsylvania.See photo of Charles II (1660-85), silver Shilling, 1666, elephant below "guinea" type laureate head right, legend and toothed border surrounding, CAROLVS . II. DEI. GRATIA, rev. crowned cruciform shields, interlinked pairs of Cs in angles, garter star at centre, date either side of top crown, .MAG. BR.FRA. ET.HIB. REX. weight 5.85g (Bull 509 R4; ESC 1027; S.3374). Toned with some blemishes, good fine, reverse stronger and very rare.The Latin legends translate as on the obverse "Charles the Second, by the grace of God" and on the reverse, "King of Great Britain, France and Ireland"The elephant is the badge of the "Royal Company of Adventurers" founded by the Duke of York in 1662.The issues of such provenance marked coins happened according to the boom or bust of the company and related to the import and export of metal or coin as at that time there was restrictions on British coin physically leaving our shores. By importing gold and other alloys the company was winning the right to be able to export just as much coinage as economic wealth it was bringing in, hence the issue of coin so marked. In the run up to the 1666 issue of elephant silver coinage, gold Guineas had been struck in 1663, 1664 and 1665 and Two Guinea pieces dated 1664. There would have been a by-product of smelting the gold for these coinages which would have been silver alloy, which once accumulated in enough quantity, perhaps by 1666 allowing for the coinage of Crowns, Halfcrowns and Shillings. It is known that the Royal Company of Adventurers was generally importing gold from Guinea in Africa, but not particularly silver. Though research is ongoing into the activities of this Company it would seem to make sense that the coinage of 1666 was a result of all the alloy of the gold mintings of the three years before. Interestingly the head used for the gold Guinea coin was used to mint this run of shillings and is consequently the rarest elephant silver coin of 1666 and does not come much better preserved than the example we have offered here. The usual variety of bust for the shilling also exists for this date, and is more often encountered and at least three of those exist in top grade. There was no elephant gold coinage for the date 1666, the year of the Great Fire of London, making this one year only type of the Shilling especially desirable.1790 The death of Flora Macdonald, the Scottish Jacobite heroine who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie (the Stuart claimant to the British throne) escape after the Battle of Culloden in 1746.1824 The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI was formed) by Sir William Hillary. Initially known as the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck, Hillary was inspired to form the charitable organization when he saw a fishing fleet destroyed by a storm off the Isle of Man. See picture of St. Justinian's RNLI Lifeboat Station and the picture of Scarborough's RNLI lifeboat.1882 The first electric trams in Britain ran; from Leytonstone in East London.1890 The Forth Railway Bridge in Scotland was opened by the Prince of Wales. The bridge is more than one and a half miles long and took six years to build. See picture of the Forth Rail Bridge.1912 Suffragettes, demanding votes for women, smashed every window they passed in Knightsbridge as a protest at government inaction.Information gathered from the following sources..www.vcoins.com/www.beautifulbritain.co.uk/Compiled and posted from Kent, UK.. ... See MoreSee Less
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www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9321723/Figure-looked-like-red-blob-2-500-year-old-Etrusc...Researchers used multi-illumination hyperspectral extraction to reveal a figure hidden in an Etruscan painting. The technique scans images using visible, ultraviolet and infrared light. ... See MoreSee Less
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Drone footage of Exeter bomb ... See MoreSee Less
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Worlds First Portable HD Microscope Camera! ... See MoreSee Less
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