Finds Identified 2 Now available from Greenlight Publishing

Metal Detectorist Shows All the Gold Rings He’s Found in a Local River

Metal detecting is a pastime that can be as lucrative as it is fascinating. Case in point: in 2014, metal detectorist Paul Coleman found a hoard of 5,251 Anglo Saxon silver coins worth £1.3 million ($1.7 million).

Now, a Redditor has revealed what they claim to be their findings after two months of metal detecting at a river, and they’re mostly comprised of gold wedding rings.

Continue Reading – Metal Detectorist Shows All the Gold Rings He’s Found in a Local River

Hidden Hoards and Buried Treasure Troves Are Real and Still Being Discovered

Every small child dreams of finding buried treasure, hidden by pirates or an ancient king. While adults may abandon these whimsical dreams, all hope is not lost for adventurers. Treasure troves—also known as hoards are still being found across the world. Ordinary people continue to stumble upon caches of ancient coins, gold bracelets, and silver plates to this day.

Continue reading – Hidden Hoards and Buried Treasure Troves Are Real and Still Being Discovered

Jerusalem of Gold: Ancient juglet containing gold coins unearthed in the capital

A juglet (a small pottery jar) containing four pure gold coins dating from more than a thousand years ago (the Early Islamic period), was unearthed during archaeological excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), as part of the Jewish Quarter Development Corporation’s plan to build an elevator and make the Western Wall Plaza accessible to visitors coming from the Quarter.

Continue reading – Jerusalem of Gold: Ancient juglet containing gold coins unearthed in the capital

Archaeologists Discover Treasure Trove of Metal Artefacts

Archaeologists excavating in the village of Poniatach Wielkie, within the Pułtusk County, Masovian Voivodeship, of east-central Poland have discovered hundreds of metal objects that date from the 11th / 12th-13th centuries.

Evidence of human occupation from the Middle Ages has been widely documented in the vicinity of Poniatach Wielkie, with the first large-scale archaeological study recently financed by the Mazowieckie Provincial Conservator of Monuments from 2019 to present, during the construction of modern gas reservoirs.

During their research, archaeologists found the remains of furnaces, rubbish pits, wells, and over 200 metal and ceramic objects that reveal the economic development of the medieval settlement.

Continue reading – Archaeologists Discover Treasure Trove of Metal Artefacts

The Curse of the Buried Treasure

Leominster, in the West Midlands area of England, is an ancient market town where the past and the present are jumbled together like coins in a change purse. Shops housed in half-timbered sixteenth-century Tudor buildings face the main square, offering cream teas and antiques. The town’s most lurid attraction is a well-preserved ducking stool, a mode of punishment in which an offender was strapped to a seat and dunked into a pond or a river while neighbors jeered; the device, last employed in 1809, is now on incongruous display inside the Priory Church, which dates to the thirteenth century. Christianity has even older roots in Leominster: a monastery was established around 660 by a recent convert, the Saxon leader Merewalh, who is thought to have been a son of Penda, the King of Mercia. For much of the early Middle Ages, Mercia was the most powerful of the four main Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, the others being Wessex, East Anglia, and Northumberland. In the tenth century, these realms were unified to become the Kingdom of England. Although the region surrounding Leominster (pronounced “Lemster”) is no longer officially known as Mercia, this legacy is preserved in the name of the local constabulary: the West Mercia Police.

On June 2, 2015, two metal-detector hobbyists aware of the area’s heritage, George Powell and Layton Davies, drove ninety minutes north of their homes, in South Wales, to the hamlet of Eye, about four miles outside Leominster. The farmland there is picturesque: narrow, hedgerow-lined lanes wend among pastures dotted with spreading trees and undulating crop fields. Anyone fascinated by the layered accretions of British history—or eager to learn what might be buried within those layers—would find it an attractive spot. English place-names, most of which date back to Anglo-Saxon times, are often repositories of meaning: the name Eye, for example, derives from Old English, and translates as “dry ground in a marsh.” Just outside the hamlet was a rise in the landscape, identified on maps by the tantalizing appellation of King’s Hall Hill.

Continue reading – The Curse of the Buried Treasure

Viking silver treasure uncovered in Täby in Stockholm

A 1000-year-old silver hoard containing several beautiful torque-style neck rings, arm rings and coins has been discovered in Viggbyholm, Täby, outside Stockholm. “This is something you probably only experience once in a lifetime”, says Maria Lingström at The Archaeologists, National Historical Museums in Sweden.

Continue reading – Viking silver treasure uncovered in Täby in Stockholm

First known picture of an Englishman is found on Anglo-Saxon penny dating from 640AD unearthed by detectorist in Essex field

  • Detectorist Chris Kutler, 57, found haul of coins in a field near Chelmsford, Essex
  • They date back to 640AD during Anglo-Saxon era and later Merovingian dynasty
  • Chris now believes an image on one coin depicts a settler from a Germanic tribe who became one of the earliest English people

Continue reading – First known picture of an Englishman is found on Anglo-Saxon penny dating from 640AD unearthed by detectorist in Essex field

Grimsby man uncovers rare William III gold coin while metal detecting in Lincolnshire

A Grimsby man has unearthed a rare gold coin dating back to 1696.

Metal detectorist Shane Newbold, from Grimsby, uncovered the William III gold half guinea coin in Lincolnshire.

Coins of this type can be sold online for between £400 and £2,800 – depending on their markings and condition.

Continue reading – Grimsby man uncovers rare William III gold coin while metal detecting in Lincolnshire

Hundreds of silver coins found in muddy Lincolnshire field fetch five figure sum at auction

A collection of nearly 800 silver coins hidden in a muddy field in Lincolnshire during the English Civil War and discovered almost 400 years later by a metal detectorist have fetched £42,144 at auction.

Steven Ingram found the coins from the reigns of Edward VI (1547-1553) through to Charles I (1629-1649) in a broken pot close to Ewerby, near Sleaford, in 2016.

The area around the village saw fierce fighting during the early years of the Civil War and given the dates of the coins, it is believed that they were buried sometime between 1641 and 1643.

Continue reading – Hundreds of silver coins found in muddy Lincolnshire field fetch five figure sum at auction

HUGE HOARD OF VIKING SWORD PARTS FOUND IN ESTONIA

There’s no sword like Viking Swords. During the period from 800 to 1200 AD, numerous Scandinavians started to leave the lands of their birth to find a better life. The Vikings went to the sea and began raiding coastal areas in search of spoils and resources.

At that time, Vikings raided, traded and settled on the British Isles and in most of Europe at times. They went to Newfoundland, Russia, Iceland, and Greenland as well.

Continue reading – HUGE HOARD OF VIKING SWORD PARTS FOUND IN ESTONIA

Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Culloden battle hoard found

Musket balls believed to have been part of a supply of weapons for Bonnie Prince Charlie have been found near a ruined Lochaber croft house.

Amateur archaeologists made the discovery while trying to find armaments sent from France. The arms arrived too late to help the prince.

They were sent as part of his doomed attempt to defeat government forces as part of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion.

The hoard included 215 musket balls, coins and gilt buttons.

They are believed to be part of an arms shipment landed in Lochaber two weeks after Bonnie Prince Charlie’s forces were defeated at Culloden.

Continue reading – Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Culloden battle hoard found