Roman / 346 posts found

Where Is The Grave Of Queen Boudica?

by Dave Sadler
Boudicca, queen of Iceni people who lived in modern day Norfolk, led her tribe in about 60 AD, in a revolt against the Roman rulers of Britain. Initially successful – destroying the cities of London, Colchester and St Albans – the Iceni people were finally defeated in a battle somewhere to the north-west…

Mythbusting Ancient Rome—did all roads actually lead there?

by Dave Sadler
We all know the phrase "all roads lead to Rome". Today, it is used proverbially and has come to mean something like "there is more than one way to reach the same goal". But did all roads ever really lead to the eternal city? Continue reading - Mythbusting…

Meon Valley dig unearths evidence of temple

by Dave Sadler
AN archaeological dig in the Meon Valley saw scores of volunteers help to excavate the site of a Roman temple. Around 60 history enthusiasts wielded their trowels at the dig in Exton, which was organised by the Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group with support from…

Oxfordshire Metal detectorist mistook ‘find of his life’ for rusty tent peg

by Luke Higgins
A RARE Roman artefact, described by a metal detectorist as the 'find of his life', was initially mistaken for a tent peg. Tim Moody, from Charney Basset, near Wantage, discovered the ancient measuring instrument…

TOP FIVE: Roman Gladiators

by Luke Higgins
5. Marcus Attilius Free-Born fighter Type of fighter: murmillo  Attilius was a free-born Roman, who most likely volunteered himself for gladiatorial combat as a way of freeing himself from debt. As a rookie, he defeated the gladiator veteran and champion of Emperor Nero, Hilarus, a respected fighter…

Analysis of Roman coins tells of Hannibal’s defeat and Rome’s rise

by Luke Higgins
The defeat by the ancient Romans of Hannibal, despite the Carthaginian leader’s famous feat of marching his army – complete with war elephants – over the Pyrenees and Alps into Italy, also meant that the Romans captured…

Lufton Villa excavations reveal new details about famous fish mosaic

by Dave Sadler
A two-week excavation of a Roman villa by a team of Newcastle University students has uncovered new details about its famous octagonal fish mosaic. The dig at the fourth century site in Lufton, Somerset, has investigated a part…

14 Bizarre Things Most People Don’t Know About The Bodies Preserved At Pompeii

by Dave Sadler
in 79 CE volcanic Mount Vesuvius erupted and buried Pompeii, Italy. Hidden from the world beneath pumice and ash, it was all but forgotten for nearly 1,500 years. That all changed in 1738 when the site was discovered,…

Unique 2,000-Year-Old Hexagonal-Shaped Bronze Matrix Of Sarmizegetusa Regia, Romania

by Dave Sadler
An ancient bronze matrix, over 2.000 years of age, has just become the most valuable archaeological piece, presented at the Dacian and Roman Civilization Museum of Deva. The matrix was discovered…
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