Maritime / 198 posts found

Ancient shipwreck in Florida waters linked to French artefacts from colonial period

by Dave Sadler
Three shipwreck debris fields dating back to the mid-16th to 17th century may have been discovered in the waters of Cape Canaveral, Florida, by marine archaeology company Global Marine Exploration…

Three historic shipwrecks in the South West have been given protection

by Dave Sadler
Shipwrecks have been a source of inspiration to English writers, artists and scholars for centuries – from Shakespeare to Enid Blyton, whose Famous Five spent a whole summer exploring a fictional Cornish wreck. This…

Ship found buried in the Seaport district of Boston

by Dave Sadler
Stand down Boston Harbor Tea Party, there’s a new story in town. On May 25th, 2016, a sunken, burned ship had been uncovered during a construction project in Boston’s Seaport District. Dating back to the 1800s, this ship is a rare and remarkable find,…

Miners in Namibia discovered a ship carrying $9 million worth of Gold

by Dave Sadler
Perplexed diamond miners working off the coast of Africa stumbled upon a treasure; a 500 year old shipwreck loaded with gold worth a whopping £9 million.  The ship is appropriately named Bom Jesus; meaning Good Jesus,…

This Massive Shipwreck Graveyard Is Way Bigger Than Scientists Thought

by Dave Sadler
An underwater survey off the coast of Greece has uncovered a massive cache of wrecked ships, sunk over a span of more than 2,000 years. And researchers just keep finding more and more to add to that tally. In the nine…

Dartmouth diver joins team on exploration of WWI shipwreck

by Dave Sadler
A DIVER from Dartmouth was part of a team that has identified a lifeboat and decking still intact on the wreck of HMS Amphion, the first Royal Navy ship to be sunk in the First World War. Following the dive by the team of British Sub-Aqua…

Thames Discovery Programme: discovering the archaeology of the Thames foreshore

by Dave Sadler
Eliott Wragg, Project Officer for the Thames Discovery Programme, explores the longest archaeological site in London - the Thames foreshore.  When the tide goes out, the Thames foreshore is the longest…

A theory suggests Vikings used crystals for navigation on the sea …

by Dave Sadler
Archaeologists and researchers who specialize in studying the Vikings have learned that the people who discovered Iceland, Greenland, and North America navigated through to these lands by using landmarks, birds, whales, and…
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