Anthropology / 121 posts found

How the people of Wales became Welsh

by Dave Sadler
Britain in the early Middle Ages was very different to the country it is now. Rather than England, Scotland and Wales, the island consisted of numerous kingdoms, the fate and fortune of which fluctuated, as some kings gained lordship over others, some smaller kingdoms were swallowed by their larger…

The unique and fascinating history of the Irish Funeral

by Dave Sadler
PODCAST: Hear about the origins of the Irish Wake, the ancient practice of keening and rural funeral ‘games’. The modern Irish funeral traces its history from the neolithic to the present. This programme investigates the mysterious intentions of ancient…

Severed head of eccentric Jeremy Bentham to go on display as scientists test DNA to see if he was autistic

by Dave Sadler
The severed head of eccentric philosopher Jeremy Bentham is to go on display for the first time in decades and scientists are using the opportunity to test his DNA to…

Bones reveal social differences between the people buried in dolmens and those in caves

by Dave Sadler
The researcher Teresa Fernández-Crespo, lead author of this study, had in a previous piece of work found demographic differences between the people buried in dolmens and those buried in caves: while male adults…

Crossing the Alps in the Neolithic age

by Dave Sadler
Did Ötzi have Swiss relatives? New information has emerged this week about an archaeological discovery in Switzerland that points to significant links between areas north and south of the Alps 5,000 years ago. For years, archaeologists have been studying a copper axe blade found at the pile…

Could 10,000-year-old engraved antler be the world’s oldest gift?

by Dave Sadler
An artefact known as a bâton percé, discovered at Gołębiewo in Central Poland, is thought to have been a gift from the people of South Lapland to a distant society living hundreds of miles to the south. The antler was discovered in…

Ancient grain reveals the development of the earliest cities

by Dave Sadler
Ancient grain from the Middle East has given scientists an insight into how some of the world’s first cities developed. Small, charred remains of grain that are at least 8,500 years old provide a fingerprint of ancient farming and how villages…

Bears Ears And The Scramble To Piece Together Eons Of Stories Of Human Life

by Dave Sadler
Jonathan Till was examining some new donations - a basket, a ladle, a flute and clay pots - back when I met him last year. “Normally, we don't take things that don't have any good excavation or locational information behind…

Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding

by Dave Sadler
Early humans seem to have recognised the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found. The study, reported…

Bare bones: Five human ancestors known only from a few fossils

by Dave Sadler
Some of our ancestors are known only by the merest fossils – a toe bone here, a jaw fragment there. In those cases, it’s all we have to build the story of human evolution. But with spectacular recent finds such as Australopithecus sediba and Homo…
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